Debate on Used Clothing Import Ban: Discussion Questions from FASH455

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Background: In a proclamation released by the White House on July 30, 2018, President Trump announced to suspend Rwanda’s duty-free treatment for all African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA)-eligible apparel products until Rwanda “comes back into compliance with the AGOA eligibility requirements.” Losing the AGOA benefits means Rwanda’s apparel exports to the United States now will be subject to the most-favored-nation (MFN) tariff rate, which averaged 12.8% for knitted apparel (HS chapter 61) and 10.1% on woven apparel (HS chapter 62). 

Back in June 2017, the U.S. Trade Representative Office (USTR) announced to conduct an out-of-cycle review of Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda’s AGOA eligibility in response to a petition filed by the Secondary Materials and Recycled Textiles Association (SMART). The SMART petition asserts that a March 2016 decision by the East Africa Community (EAC), which includes Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda, to phase in a ban on imports of used clothing and footwear is imposing significant economic hardship on the U.S. used clothing industry. 

Discussion questions:

#1 Is it worth it to ban imports of used clothing in East Africa? Isn’t reusing or repurposing used clothing will be beneficial to the environment, and will promote trade, and provide lower priced to the less fortunate?

#2 Why or why not do you believe that the import ban on used clothing will boost the cotton, apparel, textile, and leather local textile industries in EAC countries and allow for an increase in jobs and economic growth there?

#3 Notably, almost none of the used clothing exported from the US to EAC countries are actually “Made in USA”—they were originally imported from Asian countries such as China, Vietnam, and Bangladesh. Also, most U.S. used clothing exports to EAC were “free giveaways” by U.S. consumers. Is it ethical for SMART to oppose the used clothing import ban so that its own can make a profit?

#4 Most EAC members are the least developed countries. Should they have the rights to reject used clothing from developed countries and start the industrialization process, or should the principle of “free trade” apply to used clothing trade?

#5 If all parties involved in the dispute on the second-hand clothing ban were to come to a compromise, what could that potentially look like and how might we go about it? Is it even possible?

#6 Why or why not do you think the booming of the used clothing trade challenges the stage of development theory we learned in week one (i.e., a country’s textile and apparel industry theoretically will go through six development stages)?

[For FASH455: 1) Please mention the question number in your comments; 2) Please address at least two questions in your comments]

Recommended reading: Why is the used clothing trade such a hot-button issue

Author: Sheng Lu

Professor @ University of Delaware

37 thoughts on “Debate on Used Clothing Import Ban: Discussion Questions from FASH455”

  1. #2 I believe it will allow those industries to grow because it will lower the competition they currently face with the SHC in the region especially cotton, and this competition also decreases the amount of jobs available, but it would also increase prices to these sectors due to tariffs

    #6 I would continue to donate used clothing because I still feel it is important to recycle clothing rather than wasting them and harming the environment in doing so. There are still many people that cannot afford clothing and will not be able to afford clothing with the increase in price if these countries made clothing domestically, and it is important to help those people that cannot afford clothes

    1. Regarding your comment on the question #2: 1) can you provide any evidence (such as statistics) to support the argument? 2) according to SMART, despite the import ban on used clothing, EAC countries will face competition from new clothing imported from China. What do you think?

      1. Sorry Professor I had not been notified of your reply to my comment.

        In terms of the ability for cotton to increase, as stated in the book “importation of dumped cheap clothes at extremely low prices have severely affected the East African cotton industry due to lack of gov policies to address local production of garments”. With 70-85 % of cotton lint produced in the region being exported, the used clothing ban could allow for the increased opportunity for investment in these areas that the USC was once dominating, such as cotton, resulting in increased operating capacities in the textile and spinning mills in the EAC, beyond the current 40-50% capacity. Such investments will allow for such mills to increase production, leading to increasing in jobs. I am only basing my comments off of what I have read in the book. That being said, there could actually be a resulting higher decrease in the job sector than increase in the sector if the ban continues and the country is not able to sustain itself and replace the jobs being lost that were in USC.

        I think the competition from new clothing imports poses a threat to the EAC. Once used clothes are gone, China and other Asian countries have the opportunity to swoop in and replace the USC industry with low quality expensive items. This will result in increased costs for the consumers. While it is acknowledged by the EAC that prices could increase with the ban, they have suggested restoring both locally made and imported new clothes to once made affordable. This is one solution to locally rising cost problem, but I personally am unsure how they can have the control and power to implement such policies on imported new clothing. As stated in the book, the EAC would have to place duty increases on Chinese imports if they want expand their local textile manufacturing. As we have seen in the US and China trade war, such duties can have negative impacts and call for retaliatory tariffs, which I do not believe the EAC State’s economies could afford.

  2. #6 I will always continue to donate used clothing since I think it is the right thing to do. I have always donated my used clothing to charitable organizations such as GoodWill. However, something I have started doing is selling old clothing instead of just tossing them away. This not only puts money in my pocket, but also saves clothing that will go completely to waist if it doesn’t make it to the GoodWill racks.

    #1 I do not think it is beneficial to ban imports of used clothing. I do not see the benefits that Trump somehow sees. I think many people in the nation of Africa benefit from used clothing since the nation is still developing. I do not see many upsides to this new ban of imported clothing. Reusing or repurposing used clothing will be beneficial to the environment, promote trade, and provide lower priced to the less fortunate. I think this is a big mistake.

  3. #1.) I do not think it is worth banning imports of used clothing in East Africa. I do believe that reusing, recycling and repurposing old clothing is beneficial to the environment because if old clothes are not they just end up in landfills which could take years to disintegrate that can build up and ultimately lead to negative impacts on the environment. In terms of reused clothing and promoting trade, I see it as a very good opportunity to trade between countries. If one person is done using it that gives a chance for another person to use it and to pass it onto some of the less fortunate people who may not be able to afford brand new products or have the resources to obtain them. I don’t see any real benefit of banning imports of used clothing. I feel it would just create tensions between trading countries, cause unnecessary environmental problems, and overall is a bit selfish in general.

    #6.) I would most definitely still continue to donate my used clothing, regardless of the debate going on. First of all, I find it ridiculous Trump is trying to ban the imports of used clothing to African nations for more or less his own benefit. Second of all, a lot of times when I have donated clothing in the past I would donate to Goodwill or other charitable companies such as Purple Heart.
    And for the most part, these clothes that I have donated have still been in pretty good condition. I usually donate old clothes that I have either outgrown or in some cases I might have worn only once and didn’t want it anymore. For this reason, I much rather prefer to donate my clothes or give them to someone else who could get a good wear out of it rather than just tossing it away. Why would I want a shirt that could get 10-15 more wears out of it to just go straight to a landfill when someone who is less fortunate would be grateful to have it? Overall, I do not agree with this ban Trump has decided to enforce so I will still continue to do what I think is morally right and helping someone else in need.

  4. #2 I think the import ban will boost the cotton, apparel textile and leather industries in EAC countries and increase jobs and economic growth because without the used clothing people will be forced to buy what is locally in those countries. The reason why they are not buying those products now is because used clothing is so much cheaper and these local businesses can’t compete. If people start buying things more locally it will increase sales of these local businesses which will create more demand which will make businesses have to hire more people which overall helps improve the economy.

    #6 I will still continue to donate my used clothing because there are still people in these countries that would not be able to afford the clothing from local businesses. It is also helpful to the environment because your clothing will not end up in landfills and the harmful chemicals from the garments will not seep into the soil causing more issues to the environment.

  5. 1.) I do not believe it is worth banning the import of used clothes. This will only cause more clothing to end up in landfills and further hurt our environment. If less fortunate people can wear these clothes then why would we try to prevent that. I believe this would be a major mistake by Trump and and will only shed a horrible light on the textile industry and instead of having a more continuous lifecycle for our clothes this ban would just cause that to end and for them to end up in a landfill.
    6.) I will continue to donate clothes but I am always reluctant because of the process I know they go through and how many clothes don’t even end up moving onto a second hand shop or the hands of the less fortunate. But there is really no other option for my clothes besides just donating them and hoping that they aren’t trash bound.

    1. great thought! the same question as I asked other students: why do you think the EAC countries have to help the U.S. achieve “Sustainability”? Why not just ask each country to be responsible for handling its own created secondhand clothing?

  6. 1) I believe that it is not worth banning imports of used clothing in East Africa due to the possible sustainability efforts that would be denied. Reusing and repurposing used clothing are sustainability efforts for the fashion industry. The fashion industry is one of the highest polluting industries in the world. The used clothes have a purpose when they are sent to East Africa in order to be reused and repurposed rather than being sent to a landfill which takes up space and causes effects the environment in a poor way. Sending used clothes to East Africa also promotes trade in a global industry.

    6) I will continue to donate used clothing with the debate on the impacts of used clothing trade on African nations. Donating used clothing is an alternative to throwing it out and having it go to waste. Especially clothing that is donated because of fit or is out of style, can be repurposed and reused extremely easily. Donating clothes is a sustainability effort for the environment by consumers like myself.

    1. great thought. one follow up question: why do you think the EAC countries have to help the U.S. achieve “Sustainability”? Why not just ask each country to be responsible for handling its own created secondhand clothing?

  7. 1.) I do not believe that it is worth banning imports of used clothing in East Africa. Many people in Africa immensely benefit from used clothing, and often, used clothing is all they can afford. Reusing and repurposing used clothing is not only beneficial to the less fortunate, it is also beneficial to the environment in terms of sustainability, and promotes trade worldwide.

    6.) I will definitely still continue to donate my used clothing. Ultimately, at the end of the day, if my used clothing can help someone else in a developing country/ or within America, it is still helping them. Donating clothes is a greatly sustainable alternative, compared to clothes getting thrown in a landfill and them emitting chemicals into the environment. I would much rather donate clothes to someone who can wear them again, then them going to waste and encourage everyone to do so.

    1. great thinking. One follow-up question: since you oppose the used clothing ban, so what is your critique on the comments made by EAC countries? Why or why not their concerns are valid?

  8. #1 Is it worth it to ban imports of used clothing in East Africa? Isn’t reusing or repurposing used clothing will be beneficial to the environment, and will promote trade, and provide lower priced to the less fortunate?

    Reusing and repurposing used clothing has been beneficial to the environment, has promoted free trade, and has made clothing affordable for those who are less fortunate. However, I do see the other side of the argument. This ban could help these EAC nations expand textile and apparel industries in their own countries. Throughout the past couple of centuries, many of these nations have become too dependent on developed nations, which has caused local manufacturing to diminish. If these industries expand in these countries, then their economy and employment will benefit. I don’t think that there should be an immediate ban on second-hand clothing because of the amount of people who depend on these clothes to live. I think it would be more beneficial to gradually phase out second-hand clothing so that these countries can compete in markets, become more technologically advanced, establish developed economies, and ultimately, become more developed countries.

    #2 Why or why not do you believe that the import ban on used clothing will boost the cotton, apparel, textile, and leather local textile industries in EAC countries and allow for an increase in jobs and economic growth there?

    I think that the ban on used clothing will boost the apparel and textile industries in EAC countries because it will force them to develop and expand their local textile and clothing manufacturing. Without relying on second-hand clothing from more developed nations, these less developed nations will have an opportunity to grow these businesses’ in their own countries.

      1. U.S. policymakers would support the petition by SMART because they would be concerned with America’s exports, and the jobs and opportunities that exist because of the second-hand clothing trade. Thousands of U.S. jobs exist because of second-hand clothes, and policymakers would be concerned that these jobs would dissipate if EAC countries ban the import of used clothing.

  9. 4- I believe the EAC members have the right to reject used clothing because it severely limits their countries abilities to create their own industries and not rely on other countries for clothing. I don’t believe used clothing constitutes as “free trade” in this case, and it is extremely detrimental to the growth of these nations by severely stunting and prolonging it.
    6- I will continue donating used clothing to other areas rather than to African countries. I believe those countries deserve the chance to function on their own two-feet and create their own industries to become more economically stable. I will donate, instead, to organizations that sell used clothing within the US.

    1. good thoughts. for your comment on question #6: what if your donated used clothing still largely will be exported to African countries? Here is the statistics: most of the world used clothing exports end up sold in the developing countries, especially the least developed ones. For example, in 2016, Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) as a whole imported approximately 20 percent of the world’s used clothing, far more than any other regions in the world. By value, the top three individual importers of used clothing in 2016 are all developing countries as well, namely Pakistan (6.0 percent), Malaysia (5.8 percent) and Ukraine (4.9 percent).

  10. #3 It sounds like the quality of the imported used clothing and shoes in East Africa is quite good and the prices are cheap. High demands from Partner States should increase the imports of these products from the US, UK, Canada, and China. I understand why the EAC would want to phase out these products in order to establish their competitiveness in the industrial sector, but I do not think this will enhance their expansion immediately. I find it unethical for SMART to phase in a ban on the imports of used clothing since this will affect the livelihoods of consumers in the EAC who rely on these second-hand goods. This clothing import ban may even allow SMART to make profits off the US and the EAC, which is just unfair.
    #4 I think that in an ideal world the EAC members would appreciate the used clothing imports and would want to continue this global trade relationship with more established countries. I understand how they might want to begin the industrialization process to increase their competitive advantage, but I’m not too sure if this is a realistic thing for them to do. On the other hand, I support them wanting to halt the undermining of local textile industries to support them while greatly considering the livelihoods in the developing countries. I wonder what the big exporters of used clothing will do and what will happen to the EAC economies when they completely ignore the intake of it.

  11. 1. I do not think that it is worth it to ban all imports of used clothing to East Africa. Many people in Africa benefit from the used clothing because most of the time, it is what they can afford to purchase. It is beneficial to those who are less fortunate and cannot purchase new clothing, but it also helps that the clothing is getting a second life cycle. Reusing and repurposing clothing is better for the environment and provide clothing at a lower price for those who need it.

    6. I will continue to donate my used clothing; I always go through and donate at the end of every school year. If my clothing can help someone in need, whether in Africa or in the US, it is a great feeling rather than just throwing the clothing out. By donating clothes, it is beneficial for the environment because it isn’t getting sent to a landfill and it is helping someone in need.

  12. 1) I do not think that it is worth it to band used clothing going to countries in Africa. Many people living in Africa benefit from the used clothing that is imported from the United States. Taking this away from the people living there that need it I feel will only hurt them rather than benefiting there country. I also agree with the second part of this question because recycling cloths to those in need helps to limit the waste created by textiles in the United States. Once again not allowing this will cause a build up of textile waste in the U.S

    6) I’m going to continue to donate my cloths to those who need it in Africa. I am a strong believer in giving to those who need it. Also this will help limit the environmental impact of the textile apparel industry, while also helping to keep the trade between these countries and the United States.

  13. #1 I think it is not worth to fully ban imports of used clothing in East Africa because lots of small and medium-sized of factories or related industries will lose income. The lower profitability of factories will lead more people to lose their jobs, then the poverty levels will be increased and other social issues will occur. Another reason is that second-hand clothing are cheap and some are in good quality that can help to meet consumers demand in East Africa. Therefore, I suggested they can limit the imports of used clothing in East Africa rather than fully ban the imports. Reusing used clothing will beneficial to the environment because these can help to extend the live cycle of clothing and reduce the needs to produce new garments from raw material that also means the consumption of raw materials is lower. This is also good to promote trading due to having consistent trading with other countries for used clothing.

    #6 I will continue to donate used clothing because recycling and reuse second-hand clothing can help to reduce negative impacts on the environment, contribute to poor people, and create more job opportunities in different industries. Even though there are still problems cannot be solved through recycling and reuse used clothing, but I don’t believe these are the excuses that not to implement this sustainability practice.

  14. #6 Yes, I will continue to donate used clothing because we have many used clothing each season, and throwing them out will just fill up the landfill faster. Also, it’s one of the easiest way to promote a more sustainable environment, and at the same time, these donated clothing can have a second life in another countries, a place where people are less fortunate than we are here in the U.S.

    #2 I believed that the import ban on used clothing will boost the cotton, apparel, textile, and leather local textile industries in EAC countries and allow for an increase in jobs and economic growth there because if they don’t have second hand clothing anymore, it forces them to really produce what they can by using locally found resources. I think since as of now, they can still import second hand clothing from the U.S., so they kind of have the reliance on that and did not push themselves to produce their own textile and clothing products. There are many animals and plant crops that they could start developing and discover the use of them, and perhaps turn these raw materials into beautiful textiles and apparels using the most native way to knit or weave.

    1. very good thought! Based on your comment on question #2, I just wonder if you think the stage of development theory we learned in the class (moving from the embryonic stage to the post-maturity stage) is challenged?

  15. 2. Think that the import ban on used clothing will help boost local industries like cotton, apparel, textile and leather. I think that because if they are creating a ban on imports then the local communities will have to rely on each other to produce and sell the things that the consumers are demanding.
    6. I will continue to donate clothing throughout my life. Ever since I was younger my mom would always pass down our clothes to friends and family and whatever was not taken we would send to goodwill. Most of the clothes I donate are in fairly new and good shape so they have a better chance of making it into the goodwill locations.

  16. #1 Is it worth it to ban imports of used clothing in East Africa? Isn’t reusing or repurposing used clothing will be beneficial to the environment, and will promote trade, and provide lower priced to the less fortunate?

    The practice of reusing, recycling and re purposing clothing benefits the environment and results in less clothing being dumped in landfills, preservation of scarce resources such as water and fuel, as well as has helping the less fortunate. While I understand the argument that this practice has a negative impact on the textile and apparel industries as a result of lower demand, but much like other industries, the textile business must adjust to these new realities. On balance, clothing those that cannot afford new clothing, saving the environment and being socially conscious must take precedence over the bottom line. I understand that the US is negatively affected by the ban but this may also result in a low supply of cheap used clothing for those in need in Africa. This ban is especially offensive when the nation selected for the import ban may, in fact, need the used clothing the most.

    #6 Given the debate on the impact of used clothing trade on African nations, will you continue to donate used clothing? Why or why not?

    I will continue to donate used clothing for similar reasons stated above in my response to question 1. I have a deep concern about the environment and donating helps those in need. In addition, the charities that I favor help the veterans and those with disabilities in the United States and will not interfere with the trade ban or the local industries in Africa.

  17. 1. Is it worth it to ban imports of used clothing in East Africa? Isn’t reusing or repurposing used clothing will be beneficial to the environment, and will promote trade, and provide lower priced to the less fortunate?

    I do not think it’s worth it to ban imports of used clothing in East Africa. Although I understand the argument that this will hurt the textile and apparel industry in a very miniscule sense, I believe that overall it is more beneficial for humanity to continue to import used clothing to Africa. I agree that reusing or repurposing used clothing will continue to be more beneficial to the environment, promote trade, and provide lower priced to the less fortunate. It is also important to remember that reusing clothing keeps it out of landfills, and with fast-fashion being such a prominent issue in the industry, we have to be doing everything we can to combat any issues that follow because of it.

    6. Given the debate on the impact of used clothing trade on African nations, will you continue to donate used clothing? Why or why not?

    I have been donating clothing for as long as I can remember, and I will continue to do so. There are many people out in the world, especially in third-world and developing countries, that do not have basic necessities, the funds to have them, or even access to them. By donating clothing, you can do a small part in making sure that someone who may not have clothes on their back, or a mother who can’t afford to clothe her children, can still have clothing as a basic necessity.

  18. #1. I don’t think that there needs to be a complete ban on the import of used clothing when it comes to East African countries. Many of these countries are under developed and struggle to support themselves and their people. So used clothing provides great resources to those who use it as a source of clothing, income, and life style. And yes it does help to cut down on waste by giving many garments a new second hand life. However, I do believe there should be regulations on the amount of imported used clothing to help control the issue. This will also help with the possible problem of used clothing which isn’t sold building up in the African countries.

    #2 I believe that the import ban will help in some ways when it comes to those industries but not 100%. The countries first need to build up those industries and have their workers properly trained before throwing them into the workplace. I still believe the import of used clothing is useful to help give people the chance to use it as a source of income and clothing. Economic growth is possible with the ban but probably not as harsh as it is in it’s current state; nothing will perfectly solve a problem no matter how much we may want it to.

  19. #2 I believe that the import ban on used clothing will definitely boost the cotton, apparel, textile and leather local textile industries because it will allow for a more sustainable way of manufacturing the clothing seeing that they will not have access to a secondhand manufacturer. It will increase jobs because more people will be needed to help create the clothing in factories as well as commit themselves to a more hands on experience in the manufacturing aspect of the job. I also believe that economic growth will be evident in this case and maybe not have such a drastic impact on the economy as it does now with imports.

    #6 I think I will continue to donate used clothing because of how prevalent sustainability has been throughout the fashion industry pertaining to recycling and reusing materials. I think that instead of throwing away old clothes it is better that they are given a second life and used for different manufacturing reasons. This will ultimately help decrease the waste that has building up in factories. Donating clothing also helps those who might not be able to go shopping for themselves or others. It gives them the opportunity to provide for themselves and for their family if needed.

    1. good thought. A follow-up question: you said that “economic growth will be evident in this case” But in history, no developed country has achieved industrialization based on consuming other countries’ secondhand stuff. Why do you think there will be a promising future should EAC countries rely on importing used clothing?

  20. 1. I believe that overall it is more beneficial to continue to import used clothing to Africa. Repurposing used clothing is more beneficial to the environment, promotes trade, and provides lower prices to the less fortunate. Many people in Africa benefit from the used clothing because sometimes this is the only thing they can afford. It is beneficial to those who are less fortunate, but it also helps keep clothing out of landfills and is getting a better repurposing use than being thrown away. I see how it can effect the US textile industry, but I do not agree with the ban on used import goods.

    6. I will definitely keep donating my used clothes to charities. The concerning issue is with the environment. Unwanted clothing is just thrown into landfills when people don’t want it anymore or have outgrown it. I don’t see the point in this when it can be donated to your local shelter or GoodWill. They even have places like Platos Closet where they give you money back on certain items to give people an incentive to donate their clothes instead of throwing them away. If I have no use for something anymore, I will always donate it so someone in need can purchase it.

    1. good thought. The same question: like you said, “Many people in Africa benefit from the used clothing because sometimes this is the only thing they can afford.” However, in history, no developed country has achieved industrialization based on consuming other countries’ secondhand stuff. Why do you think there will be a promising future should EAC countries forever rely on importing used clothing?

  21. #1
    I do not think it is worth it to ban imports of used clothing in East Africa. Not only is it beneficial to the environment, but the East African community has a high poverty rate and many people need clothing for lower prices or even for free. Also, the used clothing and shoe industry employs thousands of people in the East African community, giving workers there the ability to support themselves and their families. The USC industry is lowering the poverty rate, providing jobs, and giving clothing to those who can’t afford it. I also think this could be a good way for East Africans to preserve their local resources. The pros outweigh the cons.

    #6 I will definitely continue to donate my used clothing. There is no point in throwing away clothing and creating even more waste. I also think it is the right thing and will always donate my used clothing to charitable organizations such as Goodwill. I would even give them to friends and family before throwing them away to go to a landfill. That is a complete waste and harmful to the environment. It could really help those in need since many of them would not even be able to afford new clothing made locally.

  22. 1. Is it worth it to ban imports of used clothing in East Africa? Isn’t reusing or repurposing used clothing will be beneficial to the environment, and will promote trade, and provide lower priced to the less fortunate?

    I do not believe that it is beneficial to ban used clothing in EAC. Firstly, the secondhand clothing industry in EAC creates hundreds of thousands of jobs for people that they otherwise would not have had, enabling them to provide for their families. Banning used clothing would mean the loss of many jobs and incomes and would increase poverty, negatively impacting the entire economy. Also, since many people in EAC are extremely poor, their only access to affordable quality clothing is through secondhand clothing since they cannot afford to buy new apparel. Banning used clothing would force them to buy apparel at higher prices which would mean they wouldn’t be able to afford as much and would significantly negatively impact their standard/quality of life. The import of used clothing also means less clothing in landfills and therefore less waste, promoting a better environment and also saving resources that would have been used to create new apparel.

    #6 Given the debate on the impact of used clothing trade on African nations, will you continue to donate used clothing? Why or why not?

    I will continue to donate my used clothing because I believe that it is the right thing to do for many different reasons. We can see that the importation of used clothing is impacting EAC in a positive way. Going off of that, used clothing can be given to other people living in similar poverty conditions who also may not have had access to quality apparel. Donating clothing can only potentially help people out. If the clothing does end up in a landfill, at least it’s lifespan was extended. Donating clothing is contributing to sustainable practices in the fashion industry which I fully support. These kinds of practices could potentially make a huge impact in the world and the fashion industry specifically if more people were actively participating in these efforts. While you can’t guarantee that your clothing wouldn’t end up in a landfill somewhere, donating means there is a chance that it could be used again. Anything is better than simply throwing clothing away. We could also repurpose it. In addition, there is always going to be someone out there that needs help and could benefit from clothing donations so there is no real downside to donating.

  23. #1 I do not think it is worth banning the import of used clothing in East Africa because this heightens the chance of the clothing ending up in a landfill. East Africa is still developing with their population being lower class, they could use the cheap clothing, that is also high quality. I think this would be a big mistake and a waste of a great end use for used clothing.

    #6 I will still continue to donate my used clothing so the life cycle of the garment doesn’t have to stop with me. I will either donate it to a local thrift store or sell it using consignment shops, or apps like Poshmark.

  24. #1 It’s not worth to ban imports of used clothing in East Africa. Those reusable and recycled clothing can be given to those who possibly can’t afford the luxury of high quality clothing, but instead just need something to wear to get on with their day. Reusing clothing in a way is definitely promoting sustainability efforts. By bringing back garments that could be decomposed and wasteful in the landfill, they are being reusable elsewhere for others who care and won’t negatively hurt the environment. I think a lot of countries will want to adopt this reusing cycle and happen to trade with those countries who are determined to take part. It would indeed be beneficial for in the sustainability aspects as well as for the environment itself.

    #2
    I’m not entirely sure if it will boost the cotton, apparel, textile and leather local industries because after reading another article about Trump’s attempts to this import ban, he’s told that the ban will negatively impact the lives and workers will be unemployed. On average, the loss will reach up to 40,000 jobs. It will in fact hurt the environment because pounds of textiles will end their life cycle in the landfill. There’s a minor possibility that cotton, apparel, textile and leather local textile industries will be boosted by this but I find the likelihood to be very slim.
    https://qz.com/africa/1245015/trump-trade-war-us-suspends-rwanda-agoa-eligibility-over-secondhand-clothes-ban/

  25. #1 I do not believe it is worth it to ban import of used clothing into East Africa. Aside from the fact that many people can only afford used clothes, it also helps with the global problem of textile/apparel waste and pollution. However, I understand why there is a want for phase out and move into a more industrial setting with in the countries.

    #6 I am not very big on donating used clothing. I think that most of what people donate is often unusable and just becomes someone else’s trash problem. I will however donate a pair of sneakers that are in good condition, or I will sell shirts/dresses if they are still nice. What we mostly try to do in my house is repurpose clothing. Shirts, sweatshirts, knit garments all get cut up into rags or things like that.

  26. #1 Is it worth it to ban imports of used clothing in East Africa? Isn’t reusing or repurposing used clothing will be beneficial to the environment, and will promote trade, and provide lower priced to the less fortunate?
    I don’t think that it is worth it to ban imports of used clothing in East Africa because they would be saving money and helping the environment at the same time. Reusing and repurposing used clothing is saving the environment because it wouldn’t be going to landfills. It would help to create cheaper goods because no one would have to pay for textiles to be moved around and produced because the textiles would already have been produced.
    #4 Most EAC members are the least developed countries. Should they have the rights to reject used clothing from developed countries and start the industrialization process, or should the principle of “free trade” apply to used clothing trade?
    They should have the rights to reject specific clothing such as undergarments but I don’t think that they should be rejecting other types of clothing, unless they are past a point of being able to repurpose them into anything else.

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