Opinion: Apparel imports boost U.S. jobs

Key points:

“These four million U.S. workers – seen and unseen – help you get dressed every day. They design shoes and clothes, perform research and development, cut and sew, supervise production, handle customs and logistics, ensure product safety compliance, market and merchandise product, outfit our troops and work on the sales floor. In addition to these four million workers, there are countless U.S. transportation, distribution, warehousing, and logistics workers who depend on our industry for their jobs.”

“about 75 percent of the retail value of most clothing and footwear comes from non-manufacturing activities that happen entirely inside the United States.”
“Supply chain jobs and manufacturing jobs are equally valuable to the overall health of the U.S. economy. It is wrong to foster a public policy agenda that forces these two groups to compete against each other. ”

Written by Kevin Burke. president and chief executive officer of the American Apparel & Footwear Association.

Read more: http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0712/78779.html#ixzz21PNrJzHK

The Relationship Between Import Penetration and Operation of the U.S. Textile and Apparel Industries From 2002 to 2008

Published in Clothing and Textile Research Journal, Vol 30, No. 2, p119-133

The Relationship Between Import Penetration and Operation of the U.S. Textile and Apparel Industries From 2002 to 2008

Sheng Lu and Kitty Dickerson

Abstract

The U.S. textile and apparel (T&A) industries have respectively adopted various restructuring strategies in recent years which fundamentally changed the way the two industries operate and the shifting relationship of each sector with imports. This study empirically tests the relationship between import penetration and the operation of the U.S. T&A industries based on data at 4-digit North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code level from 2002-2008. Results from the panel data model show that overall the U.S. textile industry formed a weak cooperative relationship with import penetration level in the U.S. market and a neutral relationship was suggested for the U.S. apparel industry with imports. These findings contribute to understanding the global nature of today’s U.S. T&A industries and suggest useful perspectives for the U.S. textile trade policies.

To read the full paper, click here

Outlook for the US Textile Inudstry in 2012

An annual report prepared by the Textile World on the outlook of the U.S. textile industry in the year ahead. The report covers topics ranging from the industry output, market evaluation, price, international trade, job market and policy enviorment.

As noted by the report “Despite declines in employment, job prospects for skilled workers, engineers and merchandisers should be tolerably good as the industry evolves into one that primarily requires people with good communication skills, creativity, and who are skilled enough to operate today’s high-technology, computer-operated machines.”

To read the fulltext of the report, click here

Textile Makers Fight to Be Heard on South Korea Trade Pact

Read the full article from the New York Times:

My comment:

It is important to realize that the U.S. textile industry and the U.S. apparel industry today are no longer close parnters. Why? Because they choose different restructuring strategies in response to globalization and rising imports.