U.S.-China Tariff War: Discussion Questions from FASH455

#1 President Trump has been proposing many tariffs on imports from foreign countries such as China. Do you think that these high tariffs will actually drive more production into North American manufacturers and promote the US economy, or will it hurt the U.S. and inflate the costs of U.S. production? Why?

#2 In class we discussed that trade creates winners and losers. So will President Trump’s high tariffs create winners and losers too? Who are they? Also, why should or should not government use trade policy to pick up winners and losers in international trade?

#3 What are some possible solutions to the trade deficit between the United States and China other than high tariffs? Why or why not trade deficit is a problem to worry about?

#4 If Trump is able to impose more tariffs and even the playing field with China, will a new “China” arise from a rivaling country, which can continue to pressure US manufacturers? Why?

#5 Why does Columbia refuse to bring production to the US, as Trump would like?

#6 Columbia has been designing products to specifically get around the tariffs set by President Trump which creates trade loopholes for their company. Do you think that it is ethical for them to do this? Why or why not?

#7 If President Trump keeps raising tariffs and wants goods to be made domestically, how will other countries respond to this with all of their excess goods?

#8 Why would President Trump continue to advocate and push for this tariff even if an overwhelming amount if businesses are hurt by it, finding ways around it, or getting excused from its implications? Do the pros outweigh the cons?

[For FASH455: 1) Please mention the question number in your comments; 2) Please address at least TWO questions in your comments]

How Might Brexit Affect the Global Fashion Apparel Industry: Discussion Questions from FASH455

#1 To which extent should globalization be responsible for Brexit and why?

#2 Is the fashion industry the winner or loser of Brexit and why?

#3 Does Brexit imply that globalization is in retreat? Why or why not?

#4 Brexit has sparked immense controversy both in and outside of the UK. Given that Britain is one of Europe’s largest importers, how will Brexit affect garment factories and economies of lower-developed countries like Bangladesh and Haiti? Is there anything lower-developed countries can do to help them prepare for Brexit?

#5 Based on the readings, what could be the worst scenario of “Brexit”, particularly for the fashion apparel industry?

#6 Overall, from the case of Brexit, how do you understand that textile and apparel is a global sector?

[For FASH455: 1) Please mention the question number in your comments; 2) Please address at least TWO questions in your comments]

The Globotics Upheaval: Globalization, Robotics, and the Future of Work

Key points

  • “Globotics” or Globalization + Artificial intelligence (AI) is changing the world. Globotics means globalization mixed with new kinds of robotics, from artificial intelligence to technologies that make it easier to outsource services jobs. Particularly, globotics is injecting pressure into our socio-politico-economic system (via job displacement) faster than our system can absorb it (via job replacement). Overall, AI and robots will take jobs — but make the world better.
  • Past globalization and automation were mostly about goods— making them and shipping them. However, the era of globotics is about service-sector automation—driven by information and data.
  • The competition from software robots and telemigrants will seem monstrously unfair to white collar works who lost their jobs. When white-collar workers start sharing the same pain [as blue-collar workers], some sort of backlash is inevitable.
  • As technologies reduce the need for face-to-face contact, some developing nations stand to benefit. For example, India, with its sizeable English-speaking population and armies of techies, could become a hub for services outsourcing, just as China was for manufacturing.
  • Future jobs (that are left) will be more human and involve more face-to-face contact since software robots and tele-migrants will do everything else. In other words, the future economy will be more local and more human.
  • The problem is the short-term. In the era of globotics, it is important to make the rapid job displacement politically acceptable to a majority of voters. Governments may set the policy goal to protect workers, not jobs.

Trade Wars, Tariffs and Strategic Textile and Apparel Sourcing


Lenzing Texworld USA Winter 2019 Educational Series

Speaker: Gail Strickler, President of Global Trade Brookfield Associates, LLC & former Assistant U.S. Trade Representative for Textiles;

Topics covered:

  • The state of trade in textiles and apparel
  • Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP)—what is now without the United States?
  • Latest on the U.S. Section 301 tariff against China
  • Updates on free trade agreements and textile and apparel (including USMCA, KORUS, US-EU FTA, CAFTA-DR, and AGOA)